Wednesday, February 19, 2014

CHILD TRAFFICKING

Child trafficking can be likened to modern-day slavery. Child victims of trafficking are recruited, transported, transferred, harbored or received for the purpose of exploitation. Children are exploited and forced to work in brick kilns and sweatshops, on construction sites, in houses as domestic slaves, on the streets as child beggars, in wars as child soldiers, on farms for agriculture, in traveling sales crews, in the tourist industry in restaurants and hotels, in the commercial sex industry in brothels, strip clubs, and escort and massage services.  Some of these conditions are easy to see—but most are hidden. That's why putting a stop to child slavery is critical to UNICEF's work.



CHILD LABOUR LAWS IN INDIA

The most violated human rights are children rights. Around 185,000 children are working as domestic labour (2001 census). Is the most highlighted problem globally. 

The children’s are being forced in many labour works, domestic works, bonded labour, rag picking, forced to work in roadside eateries, prostitution, in factories etc. 

Causes:
Poverty, child trafficking, ignorance of parents, discrimination of gender, children are easily targeted only for the reason that they cannot raise their voice as adults. 



Child Labour lawa India : 
Children who are engaged in labour work for economic gains, harmful works or hazardous works below the age of 14 years.

In India there are many Laws enacted to protect the rights of children which are as follows:
The Child Labour Act, 1986.
The Factories Act, 1948
The Mines Act, 1952
The Bonded Labour System Abolition Act

Constitutional provisions:
Article 24 provides: strictly prohibits children to work in hazardous environment.
Article 21, 45 gives the right to education to all the children below the age of 14years.
Article 39 declares the duty of the State to provide the children a free and facilities to develop in a healthy manner and in conditions of freedom and dignity. 

Child labour in domestic work has been strictly banned by the Government, because of the increased cases of child abuse and sexual abuse of children especially girl child. 

The government has a special cell to help children in exploitive circumstances. These cells comprise of social inspectors, as well as other administrative personnel, employed specifically to deal with child labour issues. 

There are many organization which aims to stop the child labour on global level such as CRY, UNICEF, ILO etc. 


To stop child labour is not only governments but each individual’s social responsibility, as children are assets of a nation.

HUMAN RIGHTS IN INDIA

What are human rights?


Human rights are rights inherent to all human beings, whatever our nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, language, or any other status. We are all equally entitled to our human rights without discrimination. These rights are all interrelated, interdependent and indivisible.
Universal human rights are often expressed and guaranteed by law, in the forms of treaties, customary international law , general principles and other sources of international law. International human rights law lays down obligations of Governments to act in certain ways or to refrain from certain acts, in order to promote and protect human rights and fundamental freedoms of individuals or groups.




Interdependent and indivisible


All human rights are indivisible, whether they are civil and political rights, such as the right to life, equality before the law and freedom of expression; economic, social and cultural rights, such as the rights to work, social security and education , or collective rights, such as the rights to development and self-determination, are indivisible, interrelated and interdependent. The improvement of one right facilitates advancement of the others. Likewise, the deprivation of one right adversely affects the others.  


Equal and non-discriminatory


Non-discrimination is a cross-cutting principle in international human rights law. The principle is present in all the major human rights treaties and provides the central theme of some of international human rights conventions such as the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women.  
The principle applies to everyone in relation to all human rights and freedoms and it prohibits discrimination on the basis of a list of non-exhaustive categories such as sex, race, colour and so on. The principle of non-discrimination is complemented by the principle of equality, as stated in Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights: “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.”

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